Archive for February, 2010

Drywall

February 10, 2010

Drywall joint compound, tape, screws and adhesive are delivered and stored in the Garage.

Over 90% of the drywall materials came from various manufacturing plants within a 500 mile radius of the site.

The high strength drywall is for the ceilings, since the framing is on 24” centers.

The installation begins on the ceilings. View of the Living Room / Kitchen ceiling. Cutting the drywall for the recessed light fixtures in the Kitchen ceiling.

Drywall applied to the bottom of the floor trusses for the ceiling in the Basement Family Room.

Drywall on the ceiling and walls in the Master Bed Room.

Joint compound and tape being applied to the drywall joints.

View from the Living Room looking at the stairway to the Basement with the drywall partially taped.

View from the Living Room into the Kitchen with the drywall partially taped.

View of the Basement Family Room with the drywall partially taped.

View of the Basement Bedroom without the drywall taped.

View of the Basement Bedroom daylight window without the drywall taped.

Metal corner bead being stapled to the drywall on an “outside” corner.

Metal corner bead applied around the daylight window in the Basement Bedroom.

Moisture resistant drywall applied around the Master Bath tub.

Moisture resistant drywall applied around the Basement Bath modular tub / shower unit.

View of Living Room with drywall joints taped but with one more application of joint compound before sanding

Sanding the Living Room / Kitchen ceiling.

View of the Living Room ready for trim.

View of Basement Family Room ready for trim.

Raters, Inspections and Checklists

February 9, 2010

Independent third party verification is a key part of LEED® for Homes, ENERGY STAR®, NAHB National Green Building Program, the U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s – Indoor airPLUS, and the U.S. Department Of Energy’s – Builder’s Challenge programs. Inspectors or raters check the home for compliance with each program’s requirements.

ENERGY STAR® Thermal Bypass Inspection Checklist

Qualifying as an ENERGY STAR® home is a mandatory minimum level of energy performance required for LEED® for Homes. Completion of the Thermal Bypass Inspection Checklist is the first step of the qualification process.

At the same time the Thermal Bypass Inspection was being performed, so were the 1st inspections for LEED® for Homes, the NAHB National Green Building Program, and Indoor airPLUS. 

LEED® for Homes Simplified Project Checklist

Verification Report - NAHB Model Green Home Building Guidelines

Indoor airPLUS Verification Checklist

Insulation

February 4, 2010

The process of insulating the house begins by sealing all holes and cracks where air leakage might occur. Air leakage can cause indoor air quality problems, condensation, excess energy use, and comfort complaints. Leakage from outdoors to indoors is known as infiltration and leakage from indoors to outdoors is known as exfiltration. 

Dow Great Stuff Pro™ Gaps & Cracks insulating foam sealant is sprayed around wiring from the attic through the top plate of an interior wall.

Holes in top plate that were drilled and then not used are filled the foam. This is done to eliminate air movement inside the wall cavity.

Holes in studs are filled the foam. This same foam is applied to wire openings in all electrical boxes.

The same is applied to the shim space around all windows and exterior doors.

The joint between the bottom plates of all exterior walls and the floor is caulked. This includes the basement walls as well.

The insulation system for the walls is Johns Mansville’s loose-fill fiber glass Spider Custom Blow-In-Blanket with an R value of 23. Since it is fiberglass it will not hold moisture, it will not support mold growth, it will not rot or decompose and is non-combustible. The system is formaldehyde-free, and contains no acidic fire retardant chemicals. 

Part of the insulation system is netting that is stabled to the studs on all the Main Level exterior walls. View of West Kitchen wall.

Netting installed on the South Living Room / Kitchen wall.

The rim joist space is enclosed with the netting in order to be filled the insulation.

Insulation being blown into the netted stud space.

Insulation being blown into the netted rim joist space.

Selected interior walls were netted on both sides and filled with insulation to reduce sound transmission from one room to another.

Insulation applied around the skylight tubes.

Air chutes are installed at all soffit vents to keep attic insulation from blocking the air circulation in the attic.

Batt insulation is installed in the vaulted ceiling above the Kitchen.

Batt insulation is installed in the vaulted ceiling above the Kitchen.

After the drywall is complete, the Attic is insulated with Johns Mansville Climate Pro/Attic Protector formaldehyde-free loose fill fiberglass insulation for an R value of 38.  

View of the East wall of the East Basement Bedroom with blown in insulation above and the rigid Styrofoam on the concrete view-out wall below.

In addition to the 1” Styrofoam that was applied to the basement walls prior to starting framing, the exterior basement walls are insulated with paper faced R13 fiberglass batts.

Please visit greatstuff.dow.com to learn more abot Dow Great Stuff and visti www.jm.com to learn more about  Johns Mansville’s insulation products.

Upon completion of the insulation, another series of inspections are completed to assure compliance with the LEED® for Homes, ENERGY STAR®, NAHB Green Building, Indoor airPlus, and the Builders Challenge programs.