Archive for April, 2010

Certifications & Acknowledgments

April 16, 2010

Soon after the third-party performance testing was performed, all the required forms were submitted to the various agencies to review and approve our applications for certifications.  

  

Sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Builder’s Challenge recognizes exceptional attention to quality and energy performance. The program uses the EnergySmart Home scale to rate efficiency. To meet the challenge, a home must achieve a rating of 70 or lower, representing an improvement of 30% over a typical home. This home met the challenge on March 1st, 2010 with a rating of 55.  

  

The NAHB Green Building Program was initiated in 2005 by the National Association of Home Builders. The NAHB Green Building program is similar to LEED, but only applicable to residential construction. Green Building Program houses are awarded points within specific categories and can receive a rating of Bronze, Silver, Gold or Emerald. On March 24, 2010 this home was awarded a Gold rating from NAHB.  

  

The LEED for Homes® rating system is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings. LEED projects are awarded points within specific categories and can receive a rating of Certified, Silver, Gold or Platinum. We are proud to report that on April 6th, 2010 this home was awarded Gold certification.  It is the first home to achieve LEED certification in Wichita, Kansas.   

  

ENERGY STAR® was developed in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Its mission is to promote clean and efficient energy technologies, enabling consumers to save money while protecting the environment. This home received the ENERGY STAR on April 8th, 2010.On Friday, April 9th, Teresa Burk, from the Wichita Committee of the USGBC Central Plains Chapter presented Adam Bauer with the LEED for Homes – Gold certificate. 

Teresa Burk and Adam Bauer.

We want to acknowledge everyone that helped Bauer & Son Construction achieve these awards. The following are sub-contractors and suppliers participated in the construction of this home.

Fremar Corporation L.L.C. 
Nies Foundations 
Lafarge North America, Kansas Office 
Contractors Waterproofing Systems 
Kelly Smith Construction 
Andale Lumber Company 
Pro Build 
Lowe’s of E. Wichita 
Wheeler Lumber, LLC 
Shawn Nelson Framing 
Douglas Fry Roofing 
J.F. Miller Masonry 
North Star Comfort Services 
Overhead Door Company 
Cheney Door Co., Inc 
B & B Drywall 
Garcia’s Painting 
The Countertop Place 
Quality Granite & Marble 
Designers Expo LLC 
Bob Smith Tile Company 
Bell Mirror & Glass Inc. 
Cranmer Grass Farm, Inc. 
Hogan Sprinkler Installation, Inc. 
Hojoca Corporation 
Fahnesctock Plumbing, HVAC & Electric 

Our third-party verifiers were Guaranteed Watt Saver Systems, Inc., and Fahnesctock Plumbing, HVAC & Electric 

We also want to acknowlege all the Bauer & Son Construction employees that participated in the construction including Drew Wyss – Project Supervisor, Michael Hansen, Ed Miller and Richard Ashford. 

Finally, we want to give special acknowlegment to Adam Bauer for his vision and determination to undertake this project, Greg Bauer for his support and expertise, Laura Heagler for her dilligence and persistance and Steve Houser for his expertise.

Open Houses

April 15, 2010

Every month people who are interested in the environment meet up for a beer at informal sessions known as Green Drinks. On Tuesday, March 2nd, this group was the first to accept an invitation to the open house and tour. Please visit http://www.greendrinks.org to learn more about this self-organizing network.

Green Drinks group gathering and signing-in at the Breakfast Bar.

Laura Heagler, Bauer & Son Construction’s Green Development Coordinator explaining the home’s green features.

In addition to Green Drinks, a local TV station showed up and did several impromptu interviews. Adam Bauer, the home’s owner is being prepared for an interview.

Laura Heagler is being prepared for an interview.

Please visit the KWCH web site at http://www.kwch.com/Global/story.asp?S=12073508 to read the story and watch the video.

Tuesday, March 23rd, an open house and tour was held for local architects, and on Friday, March 26th, the Wichita Committee of the USGBC Central Plains Chapter attended an open house and tour.

The largest group to attend an open house was on the Young Professionals of Wichita (YPW), on Monday, April 5th.

A group of Young Professionals of Wichita waiting for a tour to start.

Parking in front of the house for the Young Professionals of Wichita open house.

The final open house was held on Tuesday, April 13th, for the Visioneering Environmental Sustainability Alliance.

Furniture

April 15, 2010

Now that the testing and the final inspection are complete, furniture can be move in. Since the house will be used for promotion of “green building” by holding open houses and entering it in the Parade of Homes, it was decided that some furniture would help it “show” better. 

Couch and chair in the Living Room.

Glass table and bar stools in the Dining area.

Chairs on the Deck.

Certificate of Occupancy

April 15, 2010

On March 10th the Bauer & Son Construction received a Certificate of Occupancy for the house. This completes the inspection process required by the City of Wichita.

Signed inspection card.

Certificate of Occupancy.

Shower Doors & Mirrors

April 15, 2010

Glass bi-pass doors were selected for the Bath 2 shower. A decorative framed mirror was also selected by the owner to be hung above the pedestal lavatory.

View of the top of the shower doors installed in Bath 2.

View of the bottom of the shower doors installed in Bath 2.

A frameless door and glass panel were selected for the Master Bath shower.  A plate glass mirror was selected to be installed above the vanity.

The shower door and glass side panel installed at the Master Bath shower. The mirror above the vanity is on the right side of the photo.

The mirror above the vanity in the basement bath room.

Third-party Performance Testing

April 15, 2010

While energy modeling was performed as part of the design process for this house, verification of the actual tightness of the home is required as part of the perfornance testing for LEED® for Homes Energy and Atmosphere, AE category. This test is performed by utilizing a diagnostic tool called a blower door which is designed to measure the airtightness of buildings and to help locate air leakage sites. A blower door consists of a calibrated fan for measuring an airflow rate, and a pressure-sensing device to measure the air pressure created by the fan flow. The combination of pressure and fan-flow measurements are used to determine the building airtightness.

The blower door being installed in the Maseter Bedroom door to the deck. The fan is on the floor, behind the technican.

The technican is recording readings from the pressure-sensing device connected to the blower door.

The data from this test will be used to determine the final HERS rating the house will receive.

Since we are not now going to qualify for Indoor airPLUS, we lost 13 points in the Indoor Environmental Quality category. In order to still be certified at the Gold level and achieve as many points as possible in this category, we now need to take the alternative Pathway 2 which is the Perscripitive Approach. This pathway includes 9 sub-categories that can be used to achieve points. Compliance with two of the sub-categories, EQ 5 Local Exhaust and EQ 6 Distrubution Systems will allow us to regain 3 points.

This test pictured below is for EQ5 and is performed for all the exhaust fans in the house. An exhaust fan flow meter measures the cubic feet/minute (cfm) at that particular fan and that data is compared to the fan manufacturer’s rating.

View of the test being performed in Bath 2.

The test pictured below is for EQ6 and is performed for all the supply air duct openings in the house. This device, a balometer capture hood, measures the cubic feet/minute (cfm) at a particular opeining and that data is compared to the original design criteria.

The hood being used on a supply duct opening in the basement Family Room.

Bathroom Fixtures

April 14, 2010

Water efficent toilets, faucets and shower heads qualify for points in LEED® for Homes and the NAHB Green Building Program. The toilets in all three bathrooms are rated at 1.28 gpf (galions per flush). The faucets in all three bathrooms are rated at 1.5 gpm (gallons per minute) and the shower heads are all rated at 1.7 gpm.  

The toilet and the lavatory installed in Bath 2.

The toilets selected for all the bath rooms are Wellworth® by Kohler. The pedestal lavatory selected for Bath 2 is a Devonshire® by Kohler and the faucet is a Pepetua by Luxart.  

The shower valve and shower head installed in the Bath 2 shower.

The shower valve and shower head selected are Perpetua by Luxart.  

The toilet installed in the Master Bath.

The bathtub valve and spout installed in the Master Bath.

Faucets installed on the lavatories in the Master Bath.

Shower valve and shower head installed in the Master Bath shower.

The toilet and shower valve installed in the basement bath.

Appliances

April 1, 2010

Installation of an ENERGY STAR® refrigerator, dishwasher and washing machine qualified for 11 points in the NAHB Green Building Program. In the LEED® for HOMES program, ENERGY STAR appliances were used to increase the HERS rating, only 1 ½ points were directly attained in category of Energy & Atmosphere EA9.2 Exemplary Performance for a water-efficient clothes washer.

SAMSUNG ENERGRY STAR Refrigerator installed on the South wall of the Kitchen

Whirlpool Microwave Hood Combination unit installed on the South wall of the Kitchen.

Whirlpool ENERGRY STAR Dishwasher installed on the North wall of the Kitchen.

Whirlpool Electric Range installed on the South wall of the Kitchen.

SAMSUNG ENERGY STAR clothes washer installed on the South wall of the Laundry room.

Ceramic Tile and Carpet

April 1, 2010

After the bamboo floor installation is complete, the installation of ceramic tile and carpet begin. Since carpet was selected for the Family Room and the two bedrooms in the basement and will abut to the two area of ceramic tile, the tile work has to be completed first.       

As mentioned in our previous post titled “Bamboo Flooring” on March 17th, a prerequite for LEED® for Homes, Durability Management Process requires using a water-resistant flooring within 3’ of any entry door. Ceramic tile was selected to meet this requirement at the exterior basement door. The tile selected for the door location is American Marazzi, Augustus 61, 12” x 12” ceramic tile.            

Ceramic tile installed at the exterior basement door.

Ceramic tile was also selected for the floor in the basement bath. The tile selected for the bathroom is GBI Tile and Stone, Inc. Conti, 12” x 12” porcelain tile.     

Ceramic tile installed in the basement bathroom.

The owner also sellected the “brickwork” pattern fpr all the tile which offsets the joints from row to row. Now that the tile is complete in the basement, the carpet installation can begin. The first step in the carpet installation is the installation of the carpet tack strip. This wood stripping is so called because of the sharp nails that are exposed on the top side when is installed. These tacks that will hold the carpet when it is stretched.       

The tack strip used for this installation was manufactured in Wichita, by Baco Corp.

The carpet pad selected for the installation is 3/8”, 8 lb. Ultra Magic, made by Leggett & Platt from 100% recycled materials. Please visti www.lpurethane.com to learn more about this product.       

Tack strip and pad installed on the stairs.

The carpet selected for the house is Great Scott II, manufactured by Shaw Industries and meets the Carpet and Rug Institute (CRI), Green Label Plus requirements. Please visit www.shawfloors.com/greenlabelplus to learn more about this product.  

Carpet being cut to fit in the West basement bedroom closets.

Most rooms are larger than the width of a roll of carpet so it is necessary to seam two pieces of carpet togeher. The carpet installer is seaming the carpet in the West basement bedroom.

Carpet stretcher in the basement Family Room.

After the carpet is stretched and hooked on the tack strip it is cut around the edge. Carpet being cut to fit the basement Family Room.

Carpet installation complete in the East basement bedroom.

Carpet installation on the stairs. View from the Main Level looking down.

Carpet installation on the stairs. View from the basement.

Completed stairway carpet.

Completed carpet installation, Northwest corner of the Family Room.

Completed carpet installation the basement Family Room with ceramic tile at the exterior door in the lower left hand corner.

While the carpet is being installed in the basement, the preparation for ceramic tile begins in  Bath 2 and the Master Bath. The owner selected pre-cast bases manufactured by The Onyx Collection in Belvue, Kansas, for both the showers in Bath 2 and in the Master Bath. These products are made from mixture of polyester resin and alumina trihydrate with a gelcoat on the surface. Please visit www.onyxcollection.com to learn more about this product. A atandard 60” x 30” pre-cast base is installed in Bath 2.  A custom size pre-cast base is installed the the Master Bath shower.    

Pre-cast base installed in Bath 2. The bottom of the Master Bath tub can be seen on the other side of the wall

After the shower bases are installed, the walls and floors that are to be tiled are covered with USG FIBEROCK® Aqua-Tough tile backerboard. Made of a uniquely engineered gypsum/cellulose-fiber combination, it is strong, water resistant, and mold resistant, Please visit www.usg.com to learn more about this product.    

Backerboard installed on the shower wall in Bath 2.

Backerboard installed on the shower wall in the Master Bath.

Backerboard installed on the wall around the tub in the Master Bath.

Backerboard installed on the floor in the Master Bath. The tub is on the left and the shower is on the right.

Tile installed in the shower and on the floor in Bath 2.

Shower with corner shelf in Bath 2.

Tile floor in Bath 2

The tile selected for around the tub, the floor and vanity backsplash in  is Neostile, Chocolate, 12” x 24” porcelain.  The tile selection for the shower is Neostile, Ekru, 12” x 24” porcelain.          

Tile around the tub and on the floor in the Master Bath.

Master Bath floor looking toward the vanity, shower on the left and the tub on the right.

Tile in the Master Bath shower.

View of the pre cast shower pan in the Master Bath shower. Work in the shower is done until the glass enclosure and the door are installed.

Recessed shelf in the Master Bath shower wall.

Master Bath vanity tile backsplash.

The owner’s tile selecton for the Kitchen backsplash is Dal-Tile, Modern Dimensions, Matte Cityline Kohl, 2”  x 8” ceramic.          

Tile backsplash on the West wall of the Kitchen.

Tile backsplash on the North wall of the Kitchen and under the Breakfast Bar.

Close up view of corner detail of tile around the Kitchen window.

Breakfast Bar

April 1, 2010

The owner opted to upgrade the Breakfast Bar countertop. The top was fabricated from black granite and placed on the wall on the East side of the Kitchen.

View of the Breakfast Bar top from the South side of the Kitchen.

View of the Breakfast Bar top from the Dining area.

View of the Breakfast Bar top from the Living Room.